Rome and St. Augustine

Throughout the history of western civilization we find that Rome was a very significant empire. It had, and has influenced in almost all of the areas of our society. It influenced our literature, language, art, architecture, natural law, construction, and the preservation of the Greek culture. The majority of our teachings, if not all come from Rome. This is why Rome was and is admired by many. My views and thoughts about Rome are shown in my past essays.


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St. Augustine an early Christian theologian and philosopher is a significant figure of the Christian history. His writings influenced the development of western Christianity as well as western philosophy.

His two most important writings are the “City of God” and “Confessions”, where he shows that the Roman society was decadent and corrupt, and its fall was not Christianity’s fault. In those writings he also expresses the two great groups who make up the world: the city of God and the city of man, and his conversion to Christianity.

Even up to today his writings have remained influential. This is because Augustine interpreted Christian thought using the philosophy of Plato and Neoplatonism. This interpretation resulted into a Christian thought of there being an immaterial reality, with a God that is independent and transcendent. Even if this was known before, Augustine was able to apply many reasonable arguments to back up this thinking.

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Categories: Western Civilization 1 | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

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